RVx Website: a call for input from herpes sufferers

RVx Mission Page

Above is a sneak peek at one page of the forthcoming Rational Vaccines (RVx) website.   I am hopeful that this will launch in August 2016.  To give this blog post some context, I copy-and-paste from the Mission Page of the website, as follows:

“Our mission is to solve all aspects of the herpes problem, which afflicts millions of people and too often leaves sufferers isolated and hopeless. RVx’s vision is that a complete solution to the herpes problem will involve (1) replacement of misinformation with accurate information about the disease, (2) better herpes diagnostic testing that is accurate and reliable, and (3) effective therapeutic and preventative vaccines to eventually eliminate herpes as has been done with polio and chickenpox.

The current standard of medical care for herpes is inadequate. More than four billion people around the globe are infected with herpes simplex virus serotype 1 (HSV-1) and/or herpes simplex virus serotype 2 (HSV-2), and every week another million people are newly infected. HSV-1 is the leading cause of infectious blindness in developed countries. Genital herpes increases the likelihood of the contraction of HIV by up to three-fold, which exacerbates the spread of AIDS. Because of these and other complications, the World Health Organization has called for improved methods of treatment and prevention of herpes.

RVx believes that by taking a different approach to the problem, we can assist in this fight, and help health groups and doctors stop the spread of all forms of herpetic disease. Through the development of rationally-engineered live viral vaccines and a new diagnostic test, RVx is forging the path ahead to a brighter future.”


With this introduction to RVx, I am in this post putting out a call to herpes sufferers and/or medical professionals who wish to contribute to one critical aspect of RVx’s mission; namely, improving upon the information patients receive when it comes to the diagnosis and management of herpes infections.

While sufferers are very focused upon finding “a cure” for herpes, the implementation of effective HSV-1 or HSV-2 vaccines is only, in my opinion, one part of the larger problem.  I believe that there is a very pressing need to (1) improve upon the accuracy of information provided to doctors about herpes; (2) improve upon the proper diagnosis of HSV-1 versus HSV-2 infections; and (3) provide concise and simple information to newly diagnosed patients so that they may understand what is happening in their bodies and develop a positive, but realistic, plan for how they may choose to manage their herpes and the many implications that come with the diagnosis.

In particular, I find that the level of misinformation circulating among both patients and doctors is staggering and is, in and of itself, a huge part of the problem that RVx will be seeking to tackle.  If you analyze the headers at the top of the web page shown above, the fourth pull-down menu will be for “Accurate Info,” and I offer below a draft iteration of what the banner on that page will look like for the purposes of clarifying the nature of my inquiry / call for help from herpes sufferers in this blog post.Accurate Info Banner

So, I arrive at my question for herpes sufferers or doctors who treat the condition.

What would you suggest are some of the issues you feel are most pressing that often get lost, confused, or wrong when doctors are helping their patients develop a plan-of-attack for dealing with this life-long / persistent infection?

The reason for the banner above is that I believe the level of knowledge I hear from most doctors with whom I have discussed herpes, or the treatment thereof, seems to be woefully outdated.  Generally, the average medical practitioner’s knowledge of herpetic disease reflects the same common-sense / partial understanding of herpes I heard taught to medical students when I first enrolled in graduate school in 1992.  This is pretty shocking considering that at least 100 million people worldwide and at least 5 million in the U.S. are affected by some aspect of recurrent herpetic disease (i.e., American doctors learn as much about malaria, but will interact with at least 1,000-fold fewer malaria patients).

The actual science I have seen transpire in the past 24 years has not in any substantial way changed how herpes is treated, and this is the fault of scientists in my field for spending too much time in their ivory towers and not enough time in the trenches with patients or doctors to have any clue about the actual, physical reality of how poor herpes patient management is relative to the level of scientific understanding we possess.  That is, I am not suggesting that there exists a minor gap that separates (1) the current standard of medical care for herpes from (2) what is possible using the knowledge and tools we currently possess.  I am suggesting that it is a friggin’ chasm that separates the two, and doctors are working with horribly outdated information.  Shame on scientists in my field for not being more proactive in addressing this critical issue, but at this point attention should be focused solely upon doing better moving forward.

The majority of my fellow herpesvirologists are so busy investigating the potential functions of herpesvirus proteins or microRNAs (i.e., too busy being science geeks) to have any time left to consider the clinical aspects of the herpetic diseases that afflict 100 million people worldwide.  So, I have largely written off most of the scientists in this group as a likely source of answers for actually solving the herpes epidemic.

To the other 99.9% of the world who think about other people and solving real-world problems, I repeat that a major part of RVx’s Mission is to improve the status of knowledge readily available to doctors and patients in the form of brief, bullet point need-to-know facts that will be valuable to (1) newly diagnosed herpes patients and (2) the medical professionals who are responsible for their recovery and future treatment.  In addition, I envision RVx’s Accurate Info page containing a more comprehensive list of Frequently Asked Questions on this topic to try and replace “folklore and misinformation” with “Accurate Information” that reflects the current status of knowledge.

So, herpes sufferers, this is your opportunity to chime in via comments on the blog (preferably constructive comments) on issues and questions that RVx may miss in our first pass at this portion of the website.

I offer below some of my own thoughts on the matter, but on behalf of RVx, I am calling out to those in the trenches to help this company revise the outdated narrative / mental script that most medical professionals have been provided as their “How To Guide” for advising patients on how to navigate herpes.   Call me an idealist but, as crazy as this is, I do believe that scientists should provide doctors with a synopsis of what we actually know about herpetic disease in 2016 such that we empower medical professionals to better advise their patients.  The vast majority of medical professionals sincerely want to serve their patients to the best of their ability, but that can only happen if doctors and nurses are provided with a synopsis of herpes that is aligned with what patients actually experience.

– Bill H.

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My shorthand notes on some of the Accurate Info that would benefit doctors.

1. Doctors, imagine if YOUR daughter or mother had herpes and was in a deep depression because she was scared of interacting with anyone and transmitting the infection.  Now imagine how well it would go when you talked to your daughter or mother and insinuated that she was just being a whiner because  “It is just a skin disease.”  Please do not disrespect your patients by suggesting this to your patients as it reveals both (1) a stunning level of ignorance about the psychosocial implications of herpetic disease and (2) an utter lack of empathy for the emotional suffering of others.

2.  Valtrex is not the end-all, be-all cure, so do not just write a prescription for valtrex and walk away from your patients assuming they will be fine.  Valtrex (and famvir, acyclovir, and pencicolovir) is a poorly absorbed and not terribly soluble drug with limited bioavailability.  It may be adequate for some patients, and some patients may just mount a natural immune response that controls a HSV-1 or HSV-2 infection.  However, for the 2% of HSV-infected patients who experience high level recurrent herpetic disease, (1) their herpes symptoms may have serious complications like chronic nerve pain that exacerbate the feelings of isolation, depression, and hopelessness and (2) valtrex may not be adequate to prevent these symptoms.

3.  Take some time to actually learn more about the disease.  RVx will make every effort to consolidate useful and accurate info on our website.  Please take the time to at least consider the 2-page bullet point synopsis of what you need to know.

4.  It is important to accurately diagnose HSV-1 versus HSV-2 infection, particularly in the case of genital herpes in order to give people the opportunity to establish relationships with others who carry the same virus.  Over 50% of people have HSV-1.  Thus, individuals with HSV-1 genital herpes have an exceedingly high chance of meeting a future partner who has an asymptomatic HSV-1 infection.  People who are HSV-1 asymptomatic (i.e., frankly HSV-1 seropositive) have a far lower risk of contracting HSV-1 genital herpes from an intimate relationship with a person who suffers from recurrent genital herpes caused by HSV-1.

5.  Just because it is below the belt does not mean it is HSV-2!!  Nearly one-half of genital herpes cases are caused by HSV-1 and in some pockets of the world, the frequency of HSV-1 genital herpes can exceed the frequency of HSV-2 genital herpes.

6.   Both HSV-1 and HSV-2 can cause recurrent genital herpes!  It is an unproven, but exceedingly common misconception among doctors that primary HSV-1 genital herpes never progresses to recurrent genital herpes.  This is not true.  At issue is the fact that the majority of medical professionals either do not test for, or order unreliable tests, to make a HSV-type-specific diagnosis.  Hence, medical professionals often assume that recurrent genital herpes is only caused by HSV-2, but the empirical data do not support this premise.

7.  Every medical professional knows that when the alpha-herpesvirus that is called varicella-zoster virus (VZV) reactivates from latency in the spinal ganglia, this can progress to an exceedingly painful condition that is associated with visible lesions on the skin and which is commonly referred to as “shingles.”  If doctors were properly educated about herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2), they would all know [in the front of their minds] that these are both alpha-herpesviruses that (1) share 60 genes in common with VZV, (2) establish life-long infections in neurons like VZV, and (3) when HSV-1 and HSV-2 reactivate from latency they can cause lesions on the skin and AN EXCEEDINGLY HIGH LEVEL OF PAIN, just like shingles caused by VZV.  Not every herpes patient experiences high-level neuralgia, but some do, and for some it is a DAILY EVENT that can last for years to decades.  So, please don’t tell your herpes patients they cannot have chronic pain associated with their recurrent herpes.  They can, and some of them do.  When a latent alpha-herpesvirus reactivates in the trigeminal or spinal ganglia, the inflammatory response in the ganglia intensifies and may cause neuronal misfiring of the sensory pain and pressure fibers that alpha-herpesviruses often infect.  Misfiring of pain fibers……hmmm……what would that do?  Probably, it would cause pain.  There is a robust literature that is now 20 years old documenting that chronic inflammation of T cells and other WBCs is seen in HSV-1-latently infected ganglia, and those WBCs are seen (in tissue sections) intensely encircling individual HSV-infected neurons.  This is not a hypothesis, but is a well documented fact in both mice and men.  So, just like shingles patients experience high level pain that needs to be considered and/or treated by their doctors, so too, the same is true with a subset of herpes patients.

8.  It is time to raise the bar on medical professionals’ average understanding of herpes!  For God’s sake, if you are going to advise patients  on the disease they have, then it is time to update medical textbooks with the information that scientists have been gathering about herpes latency for the past 20 years.  For those of you so inclined, you may click on the following link to learn more about the in vivo biology of herpes simplex virus, which I find to be poorly (incompletely) described in current medical textbooks.  I believe that RVx’s website will be a resource for doctors and patients to find a more succinct and pragmatic summary of the high points that everyone should know about herpes so that we may begin replacing “misinformation” with “Accurate Information.”

55 thoughts on “RVx Website: a call for input from herpes sufferers

  1. Hopeful says:

    I am eternally grateful for the work you are doing. Like many others I have both HSV-1 and HSV-2. I am preventing outbreaks through extensive self-management regiments including diet, herbal supplements, “clean” digestive tract (to strengthen absorption/nutrients and the immune system). None of this, however, does anything to assure potential partners that I am “safe.” I too am on hold with being sexually active. I recently read a research article that stated if the viral load was below 10,000 it was highly unlikely that it would be transmitted to a partner. I know that the viral load can vary, but in someone like myself that highly controls factors so shedding/outbreaks are minimal to nonexistent, is there a way to offer testing to verify that? I would be highly interested in such an offering. Of course, I am very hopeful about getting your vaccine as well!!
    Thank you do all you are doing. I beseech everyone on this blog to pray for you, your team, and your health. I believe prayer is very powerful and I don’t think God wishes for us to suffer.

    Like

  2. Ed says:

    Dr. Halford,

    Eagerly awaiting your rationalvaccine website and checking out everyday to see if it is launched..

    1. what is your take on ASP2151 ever being approved and how successful it will be (atleast until your vaccine is out in market)
    2. Will your vaccine be avilable to people outside US? (I’m from Singapore and hoping you start a trial or supply the vaccine here when its ready to launch).

    Cheers,
    Ed

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  3. optimistic says:

    Hi Bill,

    Are you also going to list your company on NY stock exchange & the shares will be available for public to buy?

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Optimistic,

      Rational Vaccines has positioned itself for that end game by virtue of its Delaware C-Corp structure, but there will be results from at least 3 clinical trials of the vaccine before I anticipate the company having the financial wherewithal to do as you suggest. Many more pressing matters to address first.

      – Bill H.

      Like

  4. Michele says:

    this is great site!

    I had low ferritin levels and Vitamin D deficiency…My primary is monitoring my blood work every few weeks and has me on high doses of Iron and D..Anyway i have been on this regimen for about 4 months. My ferritin went from 12 to 40 (he want to get it to 70 i think)>..I noticed the past few months since starting the Iron pills i have not had an outbreak. I did get some nerve symptoms that i get but I did not get an actual ob which is unusual for me when i have that nerve sensation.

    Is there a viable connection or is this more likely a coincidence?

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Michele,

      I am not a physician, and I have to acknowledge that caveat before I proceed as I may get this wrong just due to my ignorance of most of the knowledge that real doctors possess about the human body.

      Caveat stated, yes, it makes sense to me that this would be cause and effect. In particular, if you had low ferritin levels and vitamin D deficiency, that would among other things limit your bone marrow’s ability to produce both red blood cells (RBCs) and white blood cells (WBCs), which would clinically be called “anemia.” Again, not a doctor, so I am probably oversimplifying this, but this is the general idea that is important.

      Your white blood cells (WBCs) are precisely what constitute your “immune system.” When your immune system is not functioning, it cannot do its job in terms of actively keeping a HSV infection in check (at bay) and so you should have higher-than-normal herpes symptoms. If taking vitamin D and ferritin supplements is sufficient to fix the anemia, and restore normal RBC and WBC counts, then by virtue of restoring proper immune function, that should allow your body to better keep the HSV infection at bay such that it is “latent” and “aysmptomatic”………which would mean far fewer outbreaks and far fewer discernible symptoms.

      – Bill H.

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      • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

        Hi Scott,

        Yes, it is taking longer than expected to finalize the website. It is close, and the release is imminent to me……maybe not to everyone else, but for myself, who invests 2 to 3 years of my time into every paper I publish, from that perspective we are close. I am confident the website will be launched sometime in September as the “To Do” list is growing quite short.

        I can promise that no herpes-related website like this has ever been launched, so it will be something new and I anticipate that it will be an important moment, perhaps even a watershed moment, in shifting the conversation about how the medical community diagnoses, treats, and prevents genital herpes. So, I hope that once you and others see the finished product, you may appreciate why it took quite some time to assemble and put together correctly. I will make a post on the blog when the website goes live.

        – Bill H.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Iggnegative says:

    Dear Dr. Halford,

    It saddens me to hear of your own battle with health, and it is sincerely noble of you to continue your battle for everyone here and around the world. I am 21 years old, and had a genital OB of one sore that I could not get swabbed (too late). Following a bout with deep depression for three months I pulled myself up. At 5 and 6 months post exposure I was igg negative for type 1 and 2. Even though I continue to suffer from peripheral neuropathy daily and even muscle fasiculations. I am sure even the folliculitis that has developed on my thighs are a product of Hsv. After hearing “no” from many doctors who choose to blindly believe inaccurate test results, I subsequently eliminated other possibilities (Lyme etc). I am convinced I have o and g Hsv (likely type 1 because of the sole genital OB). The viral infection has caused an autoimmune thyroid response and I suffer from fatigue and alcohol intolerance. This is all just 6 months after being in the best shape of my life. Nobody listens. I even have told my functional medicine doctor about you and your blog, but she continues to disregard my advice. Herpes doesn’t just leave people alone in love, it leaves them alone and fighting for themselves in medicine. Without this resource, many would have given up. Your efforts and progress are both noble and selfless, and I hope to one day see your name mentioned as a Nobel prize winner. Perhaps one day there will be a halford prize for exposing gaping holes in modern medicine. Your vaccines offer physical hope to those of us with constant symptoms, and more mental hope than could ever be provided with a physicians Xanax script. After following you religiously for 6 months, I no longer hope for your success. Your tenacity has made me realize your success is assured, it is now just a matter of when. So Dr. H, as the voice for those of us who go unheard, I thank you from the bottom of my heart. God bless.

    -A soon to be Phd student

    Liked by 1 person

    • R roberts says:

      I was exposed to hsv1 in 94. I had lesions on my spine and flu like symptoms, sciatic pain, etc but had no idea what it was until my doctor looked at the recurring lesions more than a year later. Within a few weeks of exposure, I began getting migraines and was also diagnosed with fibromyalgia because I felt awful and painful all the time. It took decades to get a diagnosis of mollarets meningitis. The severity and frequency of active viral flares has only increased and it’s ruined my health and life. I don’t go more than a couple weeks without a problem and can no longer take a preventative because it’s given me meglocytosis and pernicious anemia, and that makes me feel awful as well. Why can’t more be done for people like me with serious chronic infections in the cns including my eyes that are now being adversely effected. What can be done? My doctors seem to have no idea what to do now that I can’t take the 3g a day preventative valtrex. I get full blown meningitis from spending an hour in the sun, getting another bug of some kind, getting very upset, eating too much of anything with more arginine than lysine, any little thing can trigger a full on attack. It’s maddening. Please tell me if there’s anything or anyone who can help.

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      • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

        Hi R Roberts,

        I am afraid that I do not have a simple answer for you, and cannot recommend anyone who would be a clear improvement over your current doctors. What I can say is that HSV-1 and HSV-2 probably cause a much greater range of symptoms (because of the latent infection in the nervous system and potential for spread via the nervous system) than the average MD acknowledges. I don’t know enough about your case to stitch together which portion of the constellation of symptoms you list are due to HSV-1, but I reiterate that it is generally true that doctors are reticent to acknowledge that HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections do not, in 100% of patients, present as a skin condition that is easily treated or managed. Sorry to hear about all that you have experienced. It sounds like a very hard situation. One day at a time.

        – Bill H.

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      • Vitamin C says:

        Hi R Roberts, sorry to hear about your condition. I have recently started intravenous Vitamin C and an intramuscular injection of Lysine. My post herpetic neuralgia has reduced significantly as well as outbreaks. There is a great deal of scientific study of Vitamin C and how it assists the immune system. My doc doesn’t comment too much on the vit C and it has been my experience that they aren’t keen on alternatives. Good luck

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      • Vitamin C says:

        Hi Dr. Halford’s….in regards to your comment to R Roberts regarding Dr reluctance to recognize the potential for HSV to spread through the nervous system. I would agree. I have been to a number of docs regarding my condition and it has been my experience that there is a heavy reliance on Valtrex and an ACCEPTANCE of the lack of advancement in treatment options and vaccine development. It is my belief that doctors, front line workers, should be, as a group, examining the impact of HSV on their patients, questioning the lack of advancement and advocating, as a collective, for their patients. As it stands, they are complacent. They are smart people and know how to read research!

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  6. Claire says:

    Hi Dr Halford,

    What made you interested in hsv research to begin with? I have one question I would love to see answered on the new website. Why does my ghsv 1 infection reactivate more often than the oral infection of the same strain? Is it the effectiveness and memory of local immune cells? I am not doing anything to cause an outbreak more so in one area than the other. This is truly puzzling me. The ghsv 1 is 12+ times more active than oral hsv 1.

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Claire,

      I do not have an answer for you. Definitely making a mental note about what you wrote, but I cannot offer an explanation. Sex and menstruation are both triggers, but I am grasping at straws on this one.

      – Bill H.

      Like

  7. Sam says:

    Hi Dr. Halford,
    I’m deeply concerned and sorry to hear you have Cancer,
    I’ve been praying for your well being.

    Like

  8. StayingUpbeat says:

    Dr. Halford,
    As usual, thank you for all your hard work and for even considering providing this resource in addition to everything else you have going on. In addition to the usual details of the herpes handbook I would sum up the information I would like to see on a support and information site as follows.

    1. A pamphlet, that patients can print and take to their doctors, explaining the information
    below
    a. Tests available, their specificity/sensitivity rates, and how tests should be interpreted
    in the context of conflicting results. For example:
    i. A positive PCR even with negative blood tests is conclusively positive for HSV
    1. Including the case of negative blood tests years later
    ii. The availability of serial PCR swabbing and situations when it is appropriate
    1. Low cost real time PCR and research showing that practically
    everyone infected sheds (at least a little) every month should make this
    much more frequent in situations of early and questionable diagnosis
    iii. The false negative rate for HSV blood testing, the window period, and the
    1-out-of-10 failure to diagnosis HSV-1 using even the western blot should be
    disclosed
    b. Realistic expectations from available treatments and dosing information on chronic
    vs. episodic (or combination) use
    i. A diagnosis of HSV should not simply come with a 30 pill/month Rx for
    valacyclovir and a bill
    ii. An Explanation that outbreaks will still occur and that there are periods during
    outbreaks when NSAIDs, topical wound treatments, or a simple ice pack, are
    more appropriate than taking more antivirals
    c. The dangers of referring someone who is not being satisfactorily palliated by
    available treatments to pain specialists
    i. Referral to psychological care should be an almost required part of GHSV
    diagnosis
    ii. Anyone repeatedly calling or visiting the doctor for their HSV is clearly (also
    dealing with) depression and should be treated appropriately
    1. There is an incredible risk of suicide and/or pain medication addiction in
    that situation
    2. The ongoing research and reasons to be hopeful that this condition is both
    manageable and will be eradicated in our lifetime
    a. Links to this and other support websites
    b. Off-label, FDA approved, or OTC treatments that have evidence of being beneficial
    that can be tried if symptom relief cannot be achieved
    i. MAOIs: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/news/newsreleases/archive/2009/Pages/herpesvirus.aspx
    1. The Selegine (EMSAM) patch made a major difference for me and is only
    $20/month with health insurance
    ii. Zinc sulfate topical creams: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3730471/
    1. There are many inexpensive forms available and seems to help a lot of
    people
    iii. High Lysine diet
    1. Though I never really got much benefit from this personally it seems to be
    pretty widely accepted
    iv. Valcyte, Foscarnet sodium, Cimetidine
    1. Each have application in certain situations and the available research
    should be available for discussion with doctors as necessary
    3. The most appropriate ways people can help to progress research toward a cure
    a. Volunteering for (and completing) HSV related clinical trials: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=herpes+simplex&recr=Open
    b. Participation in awareness campaigns
    i. Joining ProjectAccept.org sponsored events
    ii. Supporting anti-stigma “celebrities”: https://ellacydawson.wordpress.com/herpes/
    c. Donations to research (like yours)

    In a certain way I have been lucky to have both the background and the resources to understand data available about HSV. That being said it is positively sad that performing serial PCR swabbing involved purchasing my own benchtop PCR thermocycler, figuring out the primers, and troubleshooting a protocol for months.

    Its incredible to me that a key researcher of a condition that negatively affects 1/6 people ever has to struggle for resources much less incorporate and take his clinical trial overseas.

    Even though you get the same selfish questions repeatedly, I hope you realize how much we appreciate your efforts and are rooting for you in practically every way. Please don’t give up and let us know if, when and how, we can ever help.

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  9. Liza says:

    Hi Dr. Halford,

    I am so sorry to hear about your cancer. Thank you so much for the work that you are doing, it is sorely needed. It has unfortunately been my personal experience that many physicians do not know a lot about herpes, even some with a lot of experience treating herpes patients. I am now on my fifth doctor and I had to basically do the research and take the lead to get diagnosed.

    I was infected sometime in August 2015. My ex-partner had herpes, knew he was infected but selfishly did not disclose this information to me even when I got sick. My symptoms are not typical and the widely accepted commercial “accurate” tests do not work for me.

    Without going into the gory details, once I knew he was infected, my doctor at the time reassured me that if I was infected, I would definitely have known and gave me an IgM and an IgG test. I had a full panel done two month prior which was negative across the board. The IgM came back positive and the IgG negative. My doctor told me that she could not tell which one I had and to come back in 8 weeks for another IgG test.

    Needless to say I was devastated. I immediately started to research the disease, reading all the medical journals and online forums I could find as well as consulting a well known herpes expert. I read and was told that the IgM test was worthless and that by 12 – 16 weeks if my IgG was still negative, the IgM was incorrect.

    I waited the appropriate amount of time and retested. My IgG was negative 12 weeks later but I had atypical symptoms that my doctors and the expert all dismissed. They all told me that I was not infected. I had tiny, tiny, had to use a magnifying mirror to see fissures at the base of my spine that my 2nd doctor refused to swab. The area stung when I showered and happened twice in 4 weeks. The corners of my mouth cracked. It looked like angular chelitis and lasted for about 2 weeks. I started getting muscle twitches when I sat for a long time or right before bedtime and when I woke up. I could actually see my muscles in my legs and calves twitch beneath my skin. This was all very odd to me. I am very health conscious, worked out regularly and was super aware of my health. This was all very odd and had never happened before. I knew something was wrong but every doctor I saw dismissed my concerns and basically told me in not so many words that I was a paranoid hypochondriac.

    I decided to get a western blot after the prerequisite 16 weeks after last possible exposure. It came back positive for HSV 2. My muscle twitches come and go and I still do not have typical symptoms. I get flesh colored bumps, one at a time on my upper thigh that are not painful and disappear after about 2 – 3 days. My IgG 1 year later, still negative.

    The psychological and emotional impact have been unbearable. It not just an annoying skin disease. It is so much more than that for so many people including myself. The amount of misinformation, fear and stigma perpetuated by society and by some in the medical profession is staggering and frankly unbelievable.

    Thank you again for everything that you are doing and have done. I wish you all the success in the world and I also hope for a good outcome with your current personal struggle.

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  10. Broken says:

    Dear Dr Halford, firstly I am sorry to hear your personal health news. Your determination to move this forward is astounding.
    I was diagnosed in January with ghsv1. The devastation and depression this has caused is immense. I too have met such ignorance from healthcare professionals, providing vague knowledge of this disease.
    In the UK they only test with symptoms. So it’s difficult to have a blood test. I have experienced neuropathy since the diagnosis despite Drs telling me it’s unrelated. I have been refused anti virals being told they are unsafe.
    A consultant in Genito urinary medicine told me ” it’s a skin condition, get over it, perhaps you need a shrink”
    Another consultant who is on the board of the U.K. Herpes Virus Association told me to “move on”.
    I have been told conflicting information as I “should be happy it’s type 1 as it won’t recur, to “it doesn’t make a difference what type it is” not one dr I have met knew of any research that is taking place.
    I am tired of the “skin condition” nonsense this attitude has led to this disease being forgotten. Even patient groups say the same, those who want better treatments/cure are challenged.
    All I can do is wait for your vaccine release date, my life can then resume.
    Kind regards to you and thank you for all you are doing.

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Tina,

      The RVx website rollout will be coupled with offering the HSV ABVIC Test, which is type-specific and which can be ordered from home and blood collected at home (using a hemolancet like diabetics have to use daily). Even though you are in the UK, you can still order the test and it will, despite the longer transit time across the pond, give you a reliable result so that you can at least know if you are infected with HSV-1, HSV-2, or both.

      Thank you for sharing your experiences with your physicians. I may compile 20 of these, without names of course, and have a PDF available on the Accurate Info portion of RVx’s website so that medical professionals can hear the collective feedback from their patients whom they are failing to serve when they offer (1) uninformed opinions about herpes in a package of (2) arrogant “don’t worry your pretty little head” nonsense, rather than LISTENING to what their patients are saying and learning.

      – Bill H.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Cantdoit says:

    Dear Dr. Halford I was diagnosed with HSV 2 in April 2016. The biggest problem I’ve encountered is the complete ignorance of the medical community. I’m on my third doctor because I just will not accept a doctor not listening to my concerns. There is no understanding of the mental anguish this causes people not to mention the physical. I was told by my first doctor its just a skin condition and its no big deal. I was crying when she told me this. My second doctor who considers herself an expert in herpes had no idea of any treatment vaccines and had no idea what a western blot was. She also gave me an igm which is a useless test from what I understand. I finally found a infectious disease specialist who seems to be more knowledgeable and more understanding and I will stick with her. They know nothing of hsv and don’t want to and I just don’t understand this. There are people in his world that consider suicide when they find out they’re positive for hsv. Thank you for doing all the work you do.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Cantdoit,

      Thank you for adding “patient weight” behind the assertion I will be making on RVx’s website that doctors are simply not well informed about herpes (the disease) or the biology of the viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2) that cause it. My experience talking to people who suffer with herpes (over dinner, drinks, Skype, telephone, hotel lobbies, etc) precisely coincides with what you say. If the medical community and the foremost experts are only 50% right in the approaches they are taking, then they are 50% wrong and it is in that 50% wrong where the opportunities lie to improve patient info, proper diagnosis, and better treatment.

      The first step towards knowledge is humility and admitting that there may be things you don’t know (and that your patients may be right some of the time). Until we tackle that issue, everything else will be an uphill battle with better diagnostics and better treatments. I think in the case of herpes, a revolt is brewing and will be led by patient advocacy groups once better treatment options (live HSV vaccines) are available to the public…..even if only on a very small, proof-of-principle scale that needs to be blown up to a global scale by the people who want access to better medicine to treat what ails them.

      – Bill

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Anne says:

    Aside from the initial flu and outbreak, the physical effects of having GHSV2 have been minimal for me, but the emotional part has been much worse. The doctor who diagnosed me had a very “It’s not a big deal, it’s common,” attitude about it, but potential partners have looked at me like a leper. This leads to insecurity, low self-worth..etc. If only they could act like the doctor! A herpes vaccine would be something treating mental and physical ailments at the same time!

    I’m so glad to hear things are continuing to move forward and I am so sorry to hear you have cancer Dr. Halford. It sounds like cancer will not even slow you down on your life’s work.

    When it gets really cold in NYC I like to go someplace warm maybe this winter it could be St Kitts!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Anne,

      Thank you for your kind thoughts and words. Also, thank you for adding “patient weight” behind the assertion I will be making on RVx’s website that doctors are simply not well informed about herpes (the disease) or the biology of the viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2) that cause it. That is the first problem we need to fix, because it is the “no big deal” attitude that you describe that explains why the medical community is not up in arms about the (1) pathetic levels of support for the problem and (2) why there is not a greater diversity of scientists and doctors working on solving it. Nothing against the leaders of HSV-2 treatment research, but they are getting old and it is time for an infusion of new ideas that offer better odds of success.

      – Bill H.

      – Bill H.

      Like

  13. windblowshere says:

    When I was infected by a second strain of HSV 2 in 2005, I experienced severe neuralgia and watched my health decline rapidly.
    I’m on carbamazepine 200mg x2 and amitriptyline 150mg at bedtime. I lift weights and swim for an hour (each) every other day.
    Additionally, I make a saline rinse of a pint of distilled water, 1/2 t kosher salt, and 1/2t baking soda. I rinse nasal cavity 1-2 times a day.
    This helps the lesion in my head. I compartionalize pain metaphysically and I want to say to everybody:
    I got this. I’m fighting back. I’m one of the best artists and I just keep on dreaming, drawing, and painting.
    When y’all get a vaccine, I’ll be there front & center.

    Like

  14. Gary says:

    Hi Bill,

    I am one of these with worrys i have hsv (im 100% sure I have it) but the igG’s are constantly negatives. Im glad you are working on testing methods that will be more accurate and also the idea of the vaccine is briliant. It is such a mental drain(depression overcomes you) knowing this can be spread so easy and it is seen by most as a life ruiner. I’m sure a lot will agree with me on here that the mental side is the worst.

    I’m left with constant inflamed /tender skin cause of it. I’m looking forward to progress you will make to rid the stigma and the problems hsv causes to society, it is definitely downplayed and needs more funding and attention, as it destroys a lot of lives and futures for people.

    Like

  15. Rylee says:

    One thing o constantly worry about Is not only transmission to a partner,but toy family. I was only told since its hsv2 its spread by skin to skin contact. I still worry daily about protecting my kids and others.
    Another issue is knowing what foods to eat or not to eat for outbreaks.
    Will the vaccine help with daily prodrome? I’ve obky been on suppressive tgerspt about 5 days but I still have constant genital version.
    This is the worst disease and truly depressed and makes people feel hopeless.

    Like

  16. Jim says:

    I feel that the worst element in relation to this disease has been the widespread and repeated problem of misdiagnosis, subsequently leading to a worsening progression of symptoms in consequence of being denied the important and timely treatment of the anti-virals at an early stage. As deficient as they are, the anti-virals appear to offer an important therapeutic benefit, which can reduce the chances of post-herpetic neuralgia if administered early.

    Since I have been researching herpes complications, I have put together a vast array of case studies implicating herpes involvement in many disorders. They range from secondary skin ailments that occur simultaneously with or following HSV activity but aren’t herpes lesions, to the life-threatening cases of encephalitis. All of them are life-changing and distressing, no matter how serious, and all of them reduce sufferers’ quality of life. All of them seem to baffle our medical providers. Despite this, it is rarely the case that one finds a knowledgeable specialist who acknowledges the possible complications and listens to patients’ concerns. Most of the MDs I have seen, laugh and dismiss the idea of herpes being causative in chronic nerve pain and nerve dysfunction. The ignorance is not only astounding but downright dangerous to patients who deserve better treatment, and in my view, it does patients a severe disservice when knowledge is deficient and behind current research findings. We only need to look at the examples of the regurgitated information from such places as the Westover Heights Clinic and its nursing staff who repeatedly reject ideas of HSV neuralgia, when so many sufferers post their questions on the forums and when so many of those people repeat stores of the same chronic conditions of neuralgia. Just how many cases do we need to see online, where patients are reporting that their MDs have lazily diagnosed folliculitis, because they just don’t know, but it turns out to be herpes?

    I am convinced that if the live-attenuated vaccine becomes sufficiently well utilised, that we will begin to see a vast range of illnesses suddenly eliminated, previously thought not to be related to viral origin. We can already see new emerging line of research that implicates the herpes-family viruses in chronic fatigue, in digestive and colon issues, in Bell’s palsy and in polyneuritis, in certain misunderstood urinary complications and in radiculopathy. I know that immediately after I was exposed to HSV, I lost much of my energy and have never completely regained it, unless I treat myself with aggressive doses of anti-virals. If we consider the ground-breaking suggestion made by Dr. Kedur Adour way back in 1997, in which he suggests HSV-1 is “the great masquerader of our generation” (http://entinstitute.co.za/images/HH–PGE-Hamersma.pdf), it is quite shocking that little has been done by medical science (apart from Dr. Halford), to take this claim seriously, and other claims like it. Dr. Halford even accepts that long-term use of acyclovir and others, reduce one’s immunity. It’s quite logical of course — our antibodies are produced only in sufficient number to control infection — and when the underlying virus replication is attenuated by anti-virals, then it necessarily follows that IgG will reduce also. But Dr. Halford seems to be almost the only person who’s thought of this.

    There are likewise various studies suggestive that viral latency is anything but a silent and benign phase, that there is in fact an ongoing battle in the ganglia to suppress and control it (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4110040) yet we visit our medical professionals and find that we’re completely on our own and they haven’t even taken the time to familiarise themselves with new scientific resources. They laugh at our research and claim the examples to be merely “single case studies”, yet they don’t know the facts. It is simply an outrageous state of affairs and it must be rectified. I can only imagine that as an MD, it must be the worst thing possible, for a patent to present with a little too much knowledge about his subject.

    I often ask myself, is the entire medical profession misinformed in all other important matters of health, or is it just something of a quirk in herpes viruses? It’s very worrying that our providers aren’t prepared to invest the time to understand such a widespread virus with a foot in so many other illnesses, when the facts are out there for all to see. What is it with herpes that causes doctors to remain so misinformed and ignorant and leave us to suffer as a consequence? Do they not ever stop to question why it might be that varicella causes such pain but that HSV-1 and HSV-2 can’t possibly do that? Why not?

    The misinformation not only extends to the suffering that results from carrying latent HSV in so many people, but remarkably it even exists in the confusion that HSV-1 is always orobuccal and HSV-2 is always in the reproductive area. I even talked once to the originator of this patent (www.google.co.uk/patents/US5133352) – a small electric device to control active virus who has supposedly studied herpes simplex, and he was adamant that HSV-1 and HSV-2 are absolutely identical genes and that the designation, simply denotes the site of infection. Clearly, for a state of affairs such as this, what hope is there for patients to find help? And no wonder so many of us find ourselves becoming increasingly responsible for our own research and treatment, because the standard texts we see online, repeat the same old mantras.

    To wrap up, in my view these are the matters that are of paramount importance in raising the standards of care and offering sufferers the treatment that they need to get on with their lives again. This disease puts our lives completely on hold and we’re all a shadow of our former selves. We think of nothing except getting well again and how can we prosper in our careers and personal lives, in spite of this situation. But we can’t because it is absolutely life-changing. Dr. Halford deserves all the help he needs in getting this treatment available for people, even if he doesn’t always answer our messages (and phone calls!). Jim

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Jim,

      Thank you! These are powerful words and I think they stand on their own without any further comment from me. I will read and re-read your note a dozen times until I fully absorb its contents.

      Thank you,
      Bill Halford

      Like

      • Jim says:

        The sad part is that this unwillingness to accept the plausibility of secondary complications and neuropathy from HSV, must undoubtedly account in part for the absence in development of new treatment options, since acyclovir was launched in the mid 1980s. Even the more sophisticated family of pro-drug nucleoside analogues and guanosine analogue which followed later, have offered only very limited therapeutic benefit to those with chronic symptoms.

        Without this willingness to concede that HSV might be causative in seemingly unrelated illnesses and that a great number of individuals are suffering as a consequence of HSV, it seems unlikely that healthcare professionals will see the need for increased motivation. We know from experience that these professionals are often unwilling to embrace new ideas, particularly those of their patients.

        It would be grossly unfair of course to say that there aren’t other great scientists working on possible solutions, notwithstanding the fact that many of them appear to be engaged in outdated hypotheses, as Dr. Halford points out, but I wonder how many of them have acknowledged the importance of a cure and the burdensome psychological aspects of the disease in the same way as Dr. Halford has done. Indeed one of the factors that has drawn many of us to this site, is the fact that Dr. Halford has provided a mechanism for engaging with him in discussion, despite the work that it entails — something which is very difficult to find elsewhere.

        I’m sure I’m not the only one who’s found that when making contact with research scientists in this field, we have not found even the slightest support we hoped for and many professionals refuse to enter into discussions about herpes complications with everyday sufferers, even when one attempts to engage in brief and carefully crafted discussion that’s grounded in scientific research and might even offer them support and resolve in their field.

        I have no doubt that in the course of launching the live-attenuated vaccines, there will be commercial, clinical and political obstacles to overcome. I sincerely hope that those obstacles are not allowed to restrain delivery of this much-needed therapy to many and deny the opportunity for life-enhancing treatment. I know that in the course of the past year or so, many of us have looked towards this resource and sometimes made pleas for help and much of the time those pleas have been made at very difficult personal moments that we’ve been dealing with. They’ve happened unquestionably because of a failure in the provision of our medical care. From Dr. Halford’s comments on July 27th, in relation to being asked for help, it became clear that they served to add further pressure at an already stressful time.

        We need to look towards the future and cope as best we can with our difficulties in relation to this disease and stand available if required, to channel our energies into helping to get this treatment available to everyone, even if it is in just a small way. It is difficult to gain an estimation of how many of us there are, who suffer greatly with this illness but I suspect that our numbers alone would be justification for ensuring its success and that our numbers are our strength. I would like to pledge support for this treatment, irrespective of whether I even receive it myself. I think it is right that it is made available and a disgrace if it is not supported to the full by the medical profession. Jim

        Like

      • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

        Hi Jim,

        I am a bit swamped today but I do want to comment on why I am reticent to help individuals. It is simple a matter of time. I have cancer and am working on a potentially very limited clock…no way of knowing exactly, but let’s just say I have an extra sense of urgency and purpose in what I am doing.
        I can help the world or I can help individuals, but I cannot do both. I have chosen to help the world even if that means ignoring perfectly valid pleas for help from individuals. Researchers need to be judicious with their time. Those with the threat of recurrent cancer even more so. Doing what I can with the time I have, but responding to individual calls for help would simply be an unwise use of my time.

        – Bill H.

        Like

      • Jim says:

        Dear Dr. Halford

        Those of us who are participants of this forum will be extremely saddened to learn of the personal challenge that you are facing and will, I’m certain, want to wish for you the best possible outcome, myself included.

        I think we all understand that it is impossible to help individuals on a large scale and that efforts are instead, far better directed towards a widespread adoption of the live-attenuated vaccines, which can then in turn serve to benefit as many sufferers as possible. I suspect that some of us have been responding to the call for participants in the Theravax clinical trial which you mentioned within your post – “Introducing RVx” – in March. This notwithstanding, we would respect of course that your health is important and you must put yourself and your family first.

        If there is a way in which members who contribute to this group might offer added help, beyond that which you’ve requested earlier this week for contributions to website content, I think you must tell us.

        Also it would be useful perhaps to clarify if further immediate funding is important to what you are doing. We are aware of course that a commercial enterprise has been established but it is not necessarily clear if those plans require further funding in order to succeed. I am certain that some of us will be more than willing to contribute further in this way.

        I’m sure that you will be in many of our thoughts, and prayers, during the coming months and we wish you the greatest of health and the chance to overcome your situation. God bless. Jim

        Like

      • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

        Hi Jim,

        Thank you for your kind thoughts and words. In life, we are all dealt our cards and we play our hand the best we can. Nothing more. Nothing less. I am good, but just thought I would clarify why most of my work on this project happens in the background out of the light of day….far more time-efficient if I am just doing the work rather than talking about doing the work. All will be told in due course.

        – Bill H.

        Like

  17. Bb says:

    Ever since I have possibly been afflicted with HSV1 and HSV2 and my body has been going rogue I have been following many forums regarding herpes. My inbox is filled daily with alerts regarding new posts on patients either discussing this disease, crying out for help, and/or asking numerous questions that their health care provider can not answer.
    I commend Dr. Halford for what he is doing. I know I will fly anywhere in the world at this point and become a guinea pig if I have to.
    Shame on the US government for spending billions on the “Zika” virus and very little if anything on curing/preventing herpes!

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Bb,

      Wow! I did not even think of that, but you are totally right. Zika is an emerging threat and thus gets a lot of attention and money because we fear that which is new and unknown. But meanwhile, the ongoing epidemic we know all too well messes up peoples’ lives is just not getting the attention / money it deserves. I hope the Accurate Info portion of the website is a resource everyone can use right away to bring their doctors up to speed, and I hope to see it improve over time. Likewise, I hope that RVx has a destination for you to travel to for a therapeutic vaccine sooner rather than later. Who knows, maybe in St Kitts.

      – Bill H.

      Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Calvin,

      Yes, exactly. The preventative HSV-1 and HSV-2 vaccines can protect those who are susceptible to HSV become immune to acquiring genital herpes disease. This is pretty simple and has been done numerous times with live viral vaccines before…..this is why smallpox, polio, and chickenpox are not diseases that commonly occur in the U.S. today. The same is possible with a live-attenuated HSV vaccine. The therapeutic HSV-1 and HSV-2 vaccines would be for people like you. It cannot rid your body of the virus that is already there, but it offers the opportunity to reduce your symptoms.

      – Bill H.

      Like

  18. Ed says:

    Dr. Halford, I’m recently diagnosed with hsv2 and even tho I don’t have visible obs I have constant mild burning pain in my gentile region. This has been the case since I been infected.

    This constant prodome condition is making me miserable (more mental than physical pain) and agree with you 100% that hsv2 is not jus a skin rash.

    Looking forward to your website launch and your therapeutic vaccine launch.

    Two question, should I go on daily antiviral to keep this virus on check until your vaccine come out ?
    Also, will this vaccine by available in India or Singapore/Malaysia region ?

    thanks.
    Ed

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Hi Ed,
      Please consider what I say anecdotal and not backed by hard scientific proof, but my experience talking with sufferers is that valtrex (antivirals) can reduce the duration of skin symptoms associated with outbreaks but has little to no effectiveness in reducing the constant prodrome (neuralgia) that you describe. In fact, some sufferers swear that taking valtrex exacerbates the nerve tingling / pain. You would be a very good candidate for a therapeutic HSV-2 vaccine. My company just needs to put the ball across the goal line and find a home outside the U.S. where we can make that happen ASAP.

      – Bill H.

      Like

      • Ed says:

        Dr. Halford, thanks for the reply. If this vaccine is anywhere in ASIA region I will fly on a plane this instance to get that vaccine. Hope to hear from your end very soon when the vaccine will be out.. 🙂

        Like

  19. needs a FAQ from patient POV says:

    brilliant idea. i am focused on a cure, a vaccine, some kind of treatment that makes me not dangerous to others, but this is necessary as well.

    a patient faced FAQ

    so lets say u have GHSV1 or GHSV2, or both.

    once verified as a new infection from the new accurate test, the patient needs to know if he should do antivirals or not. in other words, the patient needs to be taught that in most cases, these meds don’t help b/c they destroy the bodys own response.

    they should only be used in niche cases, like during first OB, or childbirth.

    they need to know how long they need to be taking them for, in order to be able to cut down on shedding.

    there needs to be accurate info about when someone is contagious vs when the are not. there needs to be a way to tell if and when you’re contagious while asymptomatic.

    there needs to be an explanation of if the vaccine will do both HSV1n2 in one regimen, or more? will the test kit be required? does it matter where the infection is?

    there needs to be a explanation of rumor vs fact, which is it? like how much less likely is an g-hsv2 patient to pass that on, to an uninfected partner via orally as opposed to genitally? what if the partner has hsv1 in both spots?

    what are the chances with no protection in all permutations? with condoms? add valtrex? infected or not? different strains? using a virucide lubricant?

    what about foods to eat and avoid, like lysine and chocolate?

    auto-inoculation and popping your own blisters.

    some kind of stat keeping, how many have it and have no idea or signs of it? how many have it terribly? how many get it a couple times a year or less?

    if u get the vaccine, and u are now cured in the sense that u can’t infect others, will u still nevertheless test positive for herpes in your blood at the same likelihood u would now? (both the current tests, and new one)

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Dear Patient POV,

      Thank you for your detailed and thoughtful comments. I will most definitely be taking your suggestions very seriously as we develop this final portion of the website on “Accurate Info.” Thanks for your most helpful feedback.

      – Bill H.

      Like

  20. Sarah says:

    Dr. Halford,

    First and foremost, I would like to thank you for the time and energy you spend educating and updating us about your progress. We all know your time is valuable and this website is not something you’re obligated to maintain. So again, thank you.

    In response to your call from sufferers, I would like to share a few aspects of my diagnosis, which largely echo what you have already mentioned.

    When I first got the call about my diagnosis, I was simply told that the test came back positive, and was offered no information regarding which type. Only after I asked about the type did the nurse tell me it was HSV-1. She then informed me that the type didn’t matter. I am unsure why she was under the impression that the type was irrelevant.

    Secondly, although I did not feel pressured to start a daily antiviral right away, she did encourage me to consider in the future. Daily antivirals shouldn’t be the go-to solution. The diagnosis is overwhelming enough, and the idea that taking a pill every day is the only way to manage the virus is devastating and untrue. Following an HSV diagnosis, patients should be urged to wait a few months to see how their body naturally reacts to the virus. On a similar note, are there measures that can be taken to prevent outbreaks (getting enough sleep, exercising, reducing stress, etc.)? If so, such measures should be better communicated. As is the case with a lot of information about HSV, I see conflicting arguments as to whether healthy habits such as those I listed above actually do help prevent outbreaks (and to what degree).

    Lastly, managing the actual virus is the easy part. It’s managing life with the virus that gets tricky. It’s important for patients like me to know that a happy, healthy lifestyle can still be achieved following an HSV diagnosis.

    Like

  21. Sam says:

    I’ve been recently infected (less than 4 months ago) and have developed constant stabbing/burning pains in the anogenital region. My doctor had a hard time believing that the nerve pain was caused by hsv2. Here to back up the statement that hsv2 does cause Neuralgia. The nerve pain has affected my ability to talk, think, and work. Not trying to be a downer but suicide and depression are very real for those who suffer from uncontrolled herpes. Discovering this website and the possibility of real treatment that may alleviate the nerve pain has been the one thing that’s kept me from taking my own life.

    Like

    • Herpes Vaccine Research says:

      Calvin,

      Do I really have to explain this? You are asking me why vaccines that prevent future generations from getting a disease and potentially help those with HSV-1 or HSV-2 have less symptoms are important. RVx will not be offering a time machine, so there is no way to get rid of an infection. But we can make sure future generations do better than we did. I think that is pretty worthwhile and represents a concrete step forward.

      – Bill H.

      Like

      • Nate says:

        I think by “get rid” as in cure jt. I think that’s a fair question as there’s a lot of hope out there for a cure. It may be fairequired to say a cure isn’t in as near of future as a vaccine that helps with symptoms and one that helps with prevention.
        With that said, a theraputic stance will help those who suffer with the disease today and a vaccine will just about crush anyone concerned with getting it. That is more than worthwhile in my book and if you do this it will be a HUGE success. By greatly reducing the risk of someone getting it with a vaccine this should begin the destruction of the stigma.

        Good luck and thanks for your hard work!

        Like

    • Sam says:

      Bro, you need to read the rest of Dr. Halfords posts.
      Your asking him to spoon feed you a substantial history lesson that goes over a bunch of previously published posts and studies. Try not to annoy him.
      Were lucky to have such a high level researcher working 16+ hr days (in pursuit of pushing a live vaccine to market) willing answer our questions.

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